Thomas T.B. Moore F.R.G.S

Famous Tasmanian Prospectors, Explorers and Track Cutters

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Thomas T.B. Moore F.R.G.S

Postby Philski » Tue Jul 23, 2013 3:53 pm

Thomas Bather Moore (1850-1919), prospector and explorer, was born on 26 November 1850 at New Norfolk, Van Diemen's Land, fourth child of John Anthony Moore, surgeon from Northumberland, England, and his wife Martha Anne, née Read, of New Norfolk. After elementary schooling in the colony, Moore completed his education at the newly built (1863) Windermere College http://goo.gl/maps/81kGX in the English Lake District under the guardianship of an uncle. He returned to Tasmania in 1868.
Image
Seen here wearing his Tasmanian Tiger Cap with Dogs, Wanderer and Spiro
The Wanderer River is named after one dog and Spiro Range after the other.
Image
image taken: from University of Tasmania Library
on corduroy track Westcoast Tasmania 1900. He looks surprisingly healthy for a 50 year old.

In 1873 Moore participated in a tin-mining venture in Victoria and next year commenced his exploration of Tasmania's west coast by examining the area south of Mount Bischoff for tin and gold. He followed this with eighteen months in New South Wales and some time in north-east Tasmania. On 1 January 1877 with his brother James and James Andrew he left New Norfolk to investigate recent mineral discoveries around Mount Heemskirk. His route, cutting across the Tyndall Plateau, became a supply line for the west coast, but his prospecting claims proved disappointing, as did those he worked at Heemskirk next summer for the Corinna Co and at Middletons Creek on the big bend and then up to Sabbath Creek (Now Sunday Creek) before heading to the new rush at Lynch Creek near Queenstown.

I myself gained permission to prospect Sabbath Creek and left to work Lynchford. Coincidence, But i love walking his footsteps and that of Smith.

Moore spent February to May 1879 on a solitary, unbacked prospecting venture covering the area from Macquarie Harbour to Port Davey and the region south of the Arthur Range. One of the first white men to have seen the range from the south, he reported his journey to the Lands and Survey Department, noting mapping corrections, particularly in the river system. He found no worthwhile mineral traces, but the trip presaged many journeys over the next forty years, often undertaken on behalf of the government.

On 9 January 1889 at the Church of All Saints, Hobart, Moore married Jane Mary Solly. They settled at Strahan where Moore became inspector of roads and works for the west coast. Unable to conform to the constraints of bureaucracy, however, he resigned in 1891 to resume prospecting and track-cutting. From 1904 he was head of the outside prospecting party of the Mount Lyell Mining & Railway Co. He came to know the west better than any other man and the map is sprinkled with his nomenclature. His most notable achievement was blazing a track (now the Lyell Highway) from Lake St Clair through to the West Coast Range.

Moore was a competent botanist and geologist, and a founder and life member of the Queensland branch of the Royal Geographical Society. His expeditions were always undertaken with the anticipation of adding to the scientific corpus. He was the first to write on the glacial formation of the Tyndall Range (in a paper to the Royal Society of Tasmania, 1893); he collected plant varieties for Sir Ferdinand Mueller and is credited with the discovery of Coprosma moorei and three liverworts; and his fossil specimens were acknowledged by R. M. Johnston in his Geology of Tasmania. Handicapped by lack of formal education, he magnified his achievements in an endeavour to establish his reputation. Nevertheless his work amply justified his use of the signature 'T. B. Moore F.R.G.S., explorer'.

Dark-complexioned, of medium height and sturdy build, Moore was admired for his bushman's skill and endurance: he frequently walked twenty miles (32 km) through virgin bush in a day, packing a heavy load. But he was an authoritarian employer and quarrels in his camp were frequent. Sadly, his acceptance of the solitary life led to estrangement from his family. When knee trouble and chronic bronchitis obliged him to accept a desk job with Mount Lyell he sought refuge in hard drinking and the company of other bushmen.

Moore died on 14 August 1919 at Queenstown, survived by his wife, one son and three daughters. An active church member for much of his life, he was buried with Anglican rites at Strahan.

Hi claims include Lynch Creek above the King River Prospectors and Miners association claim. He was second man into the area. The Reward Claim at the Newell Prospect Flanagan's flats, Middletons Creek on the big bend, Sabbath Creek Mt Donaldson and countless others in the most remote parts of the state.

below taken from trove///
KING OF EXPLORERS
Work of Late T. B. Moore Unequalled Knowledge Regarded as being the "King of the West
Coast Explorers," The late Thomas Bather Moore, F.R.G.S., seems likely to have his name perpetuated in a utting manner hy the naming of tho now West Coast Road "The Moore Highway." The attention which bus been directed lo this matter in the last few weeks has re-called many of the exploits of this explorer, who accomplished work of such a valuable and lasting nature.
Born at New Norfolk in 1851, Mr. Moore died at Queenstown in 1919, and
as lie had wished, lils remains were laid to rest beside the waters of Macquarie
Harbour, at Strahan. Thomas Moore was the first 'in place, though not in
time, of those who have explored Tasmania. He traversed every portion of the vast territory, sometimes as
a prospector, sometimes on behalf of the State Government, and during his last few years, for the Mt. Lyell Co. Living away from cities, ho was not urbane, his knowledge of this region, was never equalled by any other, and will never be surpassed. As botanist, geographer, geologist, and master of bush
craft, Moore was richly endowed for the hazardous tasks which he undertook.
His reward in money was scanty, but in the deepest sense of life ho was eminently successful.

HIS EARLY DISCOVERIES.
It was in 1878 that Moore discovered the lakes on Mt. Sedgwick, naming the two largest Margaret and Mary. In 1877, with James Moore (his brother) and Jas. Andrew, ho had been sent out by a New Norfolk syndicate. The three men cut their own track from Lake St. Clair to Dundas, where they were over- taken by Hon. J. R. Scott, who had worked his way from Lake St. Clair totho King River, thence by way of Lakes
Spicer and Dora to Dundas, across to Heemskirk, and then by a track to the
Pieman River. When Scott and Moore met, the two parties joined in cutting atrack to Heemskirk.
In 1883 Moore was sent out by the Government, in company with Messrs. Tofft, W. C. Smith, and H. Simpson, to make a track from Lake St. Clair to Macquarie Harbour. The party picked up the old blazes of Sir John Franklin's track at Wombat Glen; crossed the King River, where the explorer struck the track made by Charles Gould, a Govern- ment geologist, in 1801. The party then went up the Linda Valley, and over the ridge by way of the Queen River to Lynch's Creek, where Con. Lynch, who was looking for gold, and who seems to havo been the first to discover that the King River flows between the Jukes and Huxley Mountains, was found at work. Hearing that the Meredith Bros, wero cutting a track from Macquarie Harbour to Lynchford, Moore tujfted off towards the Henty, followed that river to the coast, and reached Heemskirk on April 21, just two months after he started. On the return trip, Moore went by the Meredith track to the Queen River, and then back by the way that he had come. When he got to the junction of the Linda with the King River he turned south, and appears to havo been the first to explore the King River down to its entrance into the Gorge. He climbed Mt Huxley, and verified Lynch's report as to
tho course of the King between Jukes and Huxley. Moore also explored the valley between Mounts Lyell and Sedgwick, and on reaching the Gap, close to where tho Comstock mine is now working, he found a track that had been cut by Counsel, in his exploration of 1878, from Mt. Bischoff to Lake St Clair.

FIRST REPORT ON ROAD.
Moore, after carrying out these explorations, made a report on the road by the Mt. Arrowbsmith route to the Linda Valley and recommended that it should follow this way. "During all my experience In track cutting and exploring the country from the South to the West Coast," he said, "the course marked out as the proposed road far excels any yet travelled over, and is the only one that can be conscientiously recommended to the Government for construction." This report was made nearly 50 years ago, and it speaks volumes for the fore- sight and knowledge of the great explorer that the road has been constructed along practically the same route that he mapped out after his journeyings. Instead of going over Mt. Arrowsmith the new road branches round the mountain, an easier grade thus being maintained. West Coasters, almost to a man, are behind the suggestion that the now highway should serve as a monument to perpetuate the name of the great explorer who, so many years ago, actually mapped It out.

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Thomas Bather Moore (1850-1919), prospector and explorer, was born on 26 November 1850 at New Norfolk, Van Diemen's Land, fourth child of John Anthony Moore, surgeon from Northumberland, England, and his wife Martha Anne, née Read, of New Norfolk. After elementary schooling in the colony, Moore completed his education at Windermere College in the English Lake District under the guardianship of an uncle. He returned to Tasmania in 1868.

In 1873 Moore participated in a tin-mining venture in Victoria and next year commenced his exploration of Tasmania's west coast by examining the area south of Mount Bischoff for tin and gold. He followed this with eighteen months in New South Wales and some time in north-east Tasmania. On 1 January 1877 with his brother James and James Andrew he left New Norfolk to investigate recent mineral discoveries around Mount Heemskirk. His route, cutting across the Tyndall Plateau, became a supply line for the west coast, but his prospecting claims proved disappointing, as did those he worked at Heemskirk next summer for the Corinna Co.

Moore spent February to May 1879 on a solitary, unbacked prospecting venture covering the area from Macquarie Harbour to Port Davey and the region south of the Arthur Range. One of the first white men to have seen the range from the south, he reported his journey to the Lands and Survey Department, noting mapping corrections, particularly in the river system. He found no worthwhile mineral traces, but the trip presaged many journeys over the next forty years, often undertaken on behalf of the government.

On 9 January 1889 at the Church of All Saints, Hobart, Moore married Jane Mary Solly. They settled at Strahan where Moore became inspector of roads and works for the west coast. Unable to conform to the constraints of bureaucracy, however, he resigned in 1891 to resume prospecting and track-cutting. From 1904 he was head of the outside prospecting party of the Mount Lyell Mining & Railway Co. He came to know the west better than any other man and the map is sprinkled with his nomenclature. His most notable achievement was blazing a track (now the Lyell Highway) from Lake St Clair through to the West Coast Range.

Moore was a competent botanist and geologist, and a founder and life member of the Queensland branch of the Royal Geographical Society. His expeditions were always undertaken with the anticipation of adding to the scientific corpus. He was the first to write on the glacial formation of the Tyndall Range (in a paper to the Royal Society of Tasmania, 1893); he collected plant varieties for Sir Ferdinand Mueller and is credited with the discovery of Coprosma moorei and three liverworts; and his fossil specimens were acknowledged by R. M. Johnston in his Geology of Tasmania. Handicapped by lack of formal education, he magnified his achievements in an endeavour to establish his reputation. Nevertheless his work amply justified his use of the signature 'T. B. Moore F.R.G.S., explorer'.

Dark-complexioned, of medium height and sturdy build, Moore was admired for his bushman's skill and endurance: he frequently walked twenty miles (32 km) through virgin bush in a day, packing a heavy load. But he was an authoritarian employer and quarrels in his camp were frequent. Sadly, his acceptance of the solitary life led to estrangement from his family. When knee trouble and chronic bronchitis obliged him to accept a desk job with Mount Lyell he sought refuge in hard drinking and the company of other bushmen.

Moore died on 14 August 1919 at Queenstown, survived by his wife, one son and three daughters. An active church member for much of his life, he was buried with Anglican rites at Strahan.

Select Bibliography
C. J. Binks, Explorers of Western Tasmania (Launc, 1982)
Votes and Proceedings (House of Assembly, Tasmania), 1878-79, 35 (85), p 8, 1886, 9 (138), p 3
Examiner (Launceston), 15 Aug 1919
Moore papers (privately held).
Citation details
Ian McShane, 'Moore, Thomas Bather (1850–1919)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/moore-t ... /text13361, accessed 31 July 2013\

http://www.tps.org.au/bb/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=705

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NOTES ON THE DISCOVERY OF TWO RARE
SPECIES OF FERNS, NEW TO TASMANIA.

Recently, through the instrumentality of Mr. T. B. Moore, who is at present surveying tracks in the neighbourhood of the Queen's River and Huxley Ranges on the West Coast, I have obtained several interesting geological and botanical novelties. Mr. Moore's praiseworthy observations and example might be followed with advantage to science by all surveyors and other persons who have similar opportunities in new districts; for among the specimens submitted to me by Mr. Moore were two remarkable species of ferns which I at once recognised were new to Tasmania. One of them upon diagnosis I determined to be the rare Hymenophyllum marginatum (Hook and Grev.), one of the smallest of the filmy ferns, hitherto only known from localities in the neighbourhood of Port Jackson, New South Wales. The other was so novel and so densely covered on all sides with a coating of tomentum that 1 could not readily assign its position, no sori being visible on any of the fronds examined by me. I immediately submitted the two species to our illustrious honorary member— Baron Von Mueller who was extremely interested in the discovery. He at once wrote to me confirming the correctness of my determination as regards H. marginatum, and on subsequent reference to his type specimens as regards the other he afterwards wrote me to the following effect : —" I have carefully examined the little fern which Mr. T. B. Moore discovered near the Huxley Range. It is precisely identical with a species was hitherto only known from New Zealand.

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